URGENT: Baby Birds Need You

Volunteer to feed baby birds

Volunteer Spots Available!

Choose your schedule:

a 2 hour shift any day of the week…

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Simple things that help

1. Prevent your pet cats and dogs from attacking and/or “playing” with wildlife. Don’t allow them to run without supervision and, if possible, raise your cats as indoor pets. Many injuries are wounds from dog and cat attacks. Read More

F A Q’s

Take a look around our website- use the search bar at the top to quickly find more info. If you have additional questions, please call the hotline at (530)621-4661. Here are a few Q & A’s we commonly get: Read More

So you found a…

Songbird · Duck · Hawk · Owl · Squirrel · Skunk · Rabbit · Raccoon · Opossum · Deer · Coyote · Fox · Bat · Rodent · Snake

  CALL 530-621-4661

for info 24hrs / day

If you find an animal you think needs help, please call the hotline for instructions before picking it up. If the animal needs to be transported, keep it in a well-ventilated cardboard box with a lid or a closed paper bag (if a bird or reptile) in a warm, dark and quiet place until you can get it to a SWR volunteer.

IF SAFE TO DO SO, USING LIGHT WORK GLOVES, PLACE THE ANIMAL IN A WELL-VENTILATED CARDBOARD BOX OR PET CARRIER WITH SEVERAL SOFT CLOTHES, LIKE BABY BLANKETS OR T-SHIRTS UNDER AND OVER IT. DO NOT GIVE IT FOOD OR WATER… consider volunteering if you would like to be trained as a wildlife rehabilitator!

SWR Membership is required to be eligible for volunteer opportunities.

Do Something Wild Today

Wildlife rescue, rehabilitation, and release bring together amazing people in our community.

With over 600 members, 100 active volunteers, 40 trained rehabilitators, and a dozen local veterinarians, SWR takes in up to 1200 orphaned or injured animals each year.

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Learn to Rehab Wildlife

It’s so rewarding!

Come and join the wonderful people who share your concerns about wildlife and the environment. Read More

Wild Animal Rescue: Do’s & Don’ts

That ‘abandoned’ baby animal may not be– and it definitely won’t make a ‘nice pet’

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